Ssshhh…for security officers only

Security officers and supervisors who want to increase their effectiveness and efficiency while on post learn little tricks to better carry out their responsibilities. I learned these tips more than 3 decades ago and while they may be old, they are time tested and will help you out.

I know what it’s like to be a security officer sitting post. I’ve done it as an officer, supervisor, and manager. Therefore I know what it’s like to be freezing my big tookus off while sitting post or patrolling outside with temperatures hovering around -30 degrees. Additionally, if you ever sit in your car watching it rain on an empty street during a strike…

Staying awake all night long on a boring post… to those who have been around…we’ve all done it. For me, it’s hard enough to stay awake long enough to do work at night. When it’s boring and you have nothing to do but patrol a silent warehouse, it’s even worse. How do you stay awake?

Am I going to bore you with all the standard stuff? No. I’m not going to tell you to get up and walk around. Go outside and sniff the air. Nor will I tell you to get more sleep during your off hours, for some of us it just doesn’t work!

Those things may not work well, especially if you’re just too tired to even think about being tired. But one simple little tip I’ve used is this… just a pinch between your cheek and gum.

I’m talking about coffee. Take a large pinch of fresh coffee grounds and put it between your cheek and gum. The caffeine will get into your system much faster than drinking it, because it gets absorbed right into your blood stream. Is it nasty? Yes. Is it bitter? Absolutely. Will it perk you up until the sun peaks up? You betcha, especially if you don’t drink a lot of it. Since it doesn’t go through your stomach, as much, it shouldn’t upset it.

If you encounter ice and snow on a frequent basis, not to mention bitter cold, what happens if you discover a frozen lock? Be it a deadbolt or padlock, it doesn’t matter it can be exasperating if you have to get it open. How can you get it unlocked to complete your patrol and get back inside where it’s warm?

Keep in mind that this can be done even if you’re not a smoker. You should always carry a lighter and a piece of newspaper with you on patrol. With this you can stuff a bit of paper into the lock and torch it or if it’s not windy hold the flame under it. It shouldn’t take much to melt any snow or ‘unfreeze’ the lock. The only time you don’t do this, is if you work in a facility where incendiary devices are forbidden.

Do you know how to properly check a door when you’re on a patrol? It doesn’t matter if you’re inside all night or have to check doors on the outside. This little trick will help ensure that your facility is as secure as it can be when you’re on duty. And it may help prevent a devastating fire as well.

When you approach a door, put your hand on the door palm down. This will allow you to feel the door for any unnecessary heat, unless you are outside in below 0 temps (it may freeze to the door. Not comfortable to pull it off). Heat that shouldn’t be there could be an indication of a fire, therefore you need to learn your facility to know if the door is supposed to be hot or not.

Secondly, push and pull the door as you turn the knob. Using the push/pull method will allow you to know that the door is actually secure. The words to keep in mind while patrolling is push, pull, feel. These give you all indications if it is secure.

This next tip goes to how sensitive your senses are. Do you smoke? If not, then sniff the air if you’re supposed to be alone, cigarette smoke lingers for a long time as does the acrid smell of chemicals. See something move out of your peripheral vision? It may be nothing more than a bird but you need to check it out. Your gut instinct should never be ignored, unless it runs away with you like a scene from a Stephen King novel.

A last tip that  may make your supervisors cringe just a bit, but trust me it is time proven and well worth the possible headache. Be paranoid or as some would call it hyper-vigilant. No, I’m not talking about things that go bump in the warehouse at night or being so scared you can’t leave your desk to do your job.

Don’t let noises go unreported or ignored. Noises at 0300 that shouldn’t be there needs to be checked out. The same goes for 1500 on a Saturday afternoon.

Criminals can break into your facility and sound like rats or birds. Therefore checking it out you may stop a burglary or other theft. This is especially true if you work in a warehouse that houses high value material.

Criminals have been known to use nights & weekends to make noise and break into buildings. People usually think that it’s remodeling or utility work and ignore it. If you are in any doubt, call the police or your supervisor, even if it is a neighboring business.

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                                I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

What is so special about October?

Every month, week, and day of the year is set aside for some special recognition. Whether it is inane, silly, serious, or accomplishment they are there. There are those who do their best to celebrate each and every one of them. From Waffles, beer, beef & seafood, Cheeseburgers, and innumerable others.

But October is sort of special to me for several reasons. I wanted to fill you in on some of the national and state days, especially in Arizona, being celebrated and recognized and why I, and millions of others, believe in them:

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

I have never personally lost anyone to breast cancer. However, I have lost most of my mother’s side of the family to it. My grandmother had all but 1 of her 9 sibling’s die of it, including herself. My mom has had 2 forms of it and my uncle consistently has polyps removed from his colon. I also lost a very close friend to it 37 years ago, 1 week before her 19th birthday.

 

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Unfortunately, I know several women who have been the victim of this, including my mother more than 50 years ago. But that was back when you didn’t talk about such things or report it to the police. I also had a couple living across the street from me in the 60s who argued and hit each other like a heavyweight fight between Ali and Frazier. They also had the cuts, bruises, broken windows, and arrests to prove it, nearly every Friday or Saturday night.

 

Disability Employment Awareness Month

More than 70 years ago, the Department of Labor started this commemoration to recognize and encourage employers to look at hiring those of us that are disabled. It was their way, and should be everyone’s albeit in a different context, to showcase those of us that are disabled who wish to work and contribute to society.

Remember this little fact: We can do everything you can do at work and home, including, with a little assistance at times, programming computers, and plumbing, electrical, training, sales, and such expertise. We may have to bend rules, which aren’t as bad as you have been programmed to think, sometimes to get it done, but it does get done…correctly.

 

Blind & disabled Awareness Month

I have been the object of contempt walking through an area with a large crowd, which is never my favorite thing to do sighted or blind. Nearly everyone profiles those of us that are disabled. We all have our prejudices against disabled people, but you do have to remember that it also makes us individuals. When you encounter someone who is disabled think of that little line above in NDEA month “We can do everything you can do just in a different way”.

 

White Cane Awareness month

When someone walks in a public area such as a sidewalk or shopping mall with a white cane, what do you think the white cane is for? You may be surprised at the number of people who have absolutely no clue. Younger children I can understand the mystery, their parents have never taught them any different because they may catch the blindness disease and end up like us, not logical but…what can you do?

 

Meet the Blind Month

This is designed for the general public who has never had much interaction with those of us that are blind before. You are encouraged to seek out someone who is blind or a blind center such as the Arizona Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired to actually see how we live our lives as well as you do, just without workable sight.

Daily living, getting around, interacting with others, and various other activities. You may be surprised at us. Hopefully, it will dispel some myths about blindness and those of us that live with it daily.

 

I don’t want to take up much more of your time with many of the great days, weeks, and month being celebrated in October so I’ll try to keep these last ones shorter:

National Reading Group Month – Reading groups aren’t just for younger kids in school. Start your own reading group no matter your age.

National Book Month – There are ways for everyone to enjoy books. From book readers for the disabled to the old fashioned way of actually holding a paper product in your hands and falling asleep with it.

Great Books Week- First full week in October – What is your great book? Dig it out of the library, box, book shelf, or find a new one to peruse. Literacy, and the amount of freedom we have, is directly based on how much we read.

National Book Day- October 1

World Teachers Day- October 5 – Celebrate the people who helped you achieve what you have now. The teachers from elementary to college have had an influence even if you didn’t like them.

American Libraries Day-October 6

Dictionary Day/Noah Webster’s Birthday– October 6

Halloween! – October 31 – Sugar addicts, like me, rejoice!

Robert D. Sollars, who has been blind since 2003, assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of workplace violence as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                             I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

Incidents of Work Place Violence for September

Phoenix, AZ. September 1                                            1d

Phoenix, AZ. September 1                           0

Prescott, AZ. September 5                           1w

Nashville, TN. September 5 (school)        1w

Casa Grande, AZ. September 6                  2w             1d

Anchorage, AK. September 12                                       3d

Nashua, NH. September 12                                             1d

Rockford, WA. September 13 (school)      3w               1d

Atlanta, GA. September 16 (school)                               1d

Jacksonville, FL. September 18 (school)    1w

Savannah, GA. September 20 (school)                         1d

Mattoon, IL. September 20 (school)        2w

(four shootings in Central Illinois reported no school names known)

4

Antioch, TN. (church)                                      7w                  1d

Chandler, AZ. September 26 (school)     0

New York, NY. September 27                       1w                     1d

September:   19 incidents 12 dead 18 wounded

Year-to-Date: 377 Arizona: 93

111 Dead     288 Wounded

“You didn’t tell us about that!”

Ever had a home or car repair completed and then you are totally surprised with the final bill? The repairman tells you “Oh, we had to do that because…” When you try and complain about it…nothing. You either pay or they file a lien against you and your home/vehicle. Sound familiar? These are the small irritating costs of owning either one and it relates to workplace violence (WPV).

This is an issue that has plagued families and loved ones of WPV victims since it came into the mainstream more than 30 years ago. Not many people pay attention to what happens after the investigation is over. But there are many costs, and stories, that will never be covered or told.

Most of the public, media, or uninformed on WPV, won’t notice it either, even if they wanted too. The unreported costs of WPV are far more expensive than the cost to the business of clean-up, reputation restoration, replacement of equipment, and etc. It can run for a lifetime with nightmares and anxiety.

Those in the security field and specifically WPV will instinctively know these items. But most everyone else who doesn’t perceive much, except the latest fiction of the screen in front of their noses, won’t. Even most security professionals won’t know these issues either because they just aren’t associated with them on a daily basis, like other security professionals are on their specialty, which you can’t blame them for.

What are some of these unreported costs to families and businesses? Some of the reasons that businesses will ignore the potential issues associated with WPV, by sticking their heads in the sand and having the CHH attitude, are listed here:

  1. Economic loss for the families (especially if it was a single parent as in a Domestic Violence (DV) incident

How do you tell a child that you have to move because you can’t afford to live near their school, and friends, anymore? It would not be easy and that is before the crying and depression starts…again.

  1. Emotional toll on the families

Again, do you want to be the one telling a young child and their family that their mother or father is never coming home again? As heart-breaking as it is for the family it may be harder on the bearer of bad news no matter how many times they have had to do this grief-stricken task.

  1. Economic & emotional loss for employees

For some employees who may be close to the co-worker it will be hard to not look over and see their face across or next to them anymore. For some it could cause traumatic episodes, leading to psychological issues, which can last for a lifetime.

  1. Communities

The whole community will feel the loss of an employee. Even more so if this individual was a volunteer for non-profit’s and other charities involving children, hospice, animals and the like.

  1. Sense of safety that every worker has a right to feel while on the job.

As a kid you experienced the safety & security when your parents told you that there were no monsters under the bed and they checked for you. Then they let you sleep in their bed on stormy nights. Now imagine the monsters standing in front of them every day taunting and daring them to close their eyes, as either a child or adult.

  1. Work disruption/loss of productivity

A fatal WPV incident will disrupt your work flow no matter what anyone may say. Even if it’s not fatal your work and productivity will be interrupted for a period of time, minutes, hours, or days,. According to some surveys it will take 6-8 weeks to get back to full productivity after a fatal incident, which for a manufacturing business…

  1. Medical and workers compensation claims

Depending on the injuries and wounds, this could very well cost the business millions. And then of course there are the employees. Even with a platinum health insurance plan it could cost them upwards of several hundred thousand dollars or more depending on the severity and the lasting effects.

  1. Litigation

An average lawsuit that is settled over a fatal incident is nearly $6 million. Inadequate security could cost you $1.2 million. And if you look at the findings against U.S. Security Associates in March 2015, it was over $45 million for 2 families. That may have been unique but even if you are found innocent…what about the cost to litigate the case? Attorneys ain’t cheap, especially for the good ones.

 

You see that most of those items will never reach the full audience of people who may have watched the incident unfold in rapt fascination. None of the final toll gets reported, except in limited circumstances. But these costs that are directly related to an incident of WPV are real and can last for a lifetime for the families who now have to live without a loved one. Or the victim themselves who may have to live with the horror of being wounded and possibly disabled, both physically & psychologically, by an incident.

Some people can, and do, put such bloody carnage behind them easily with no lingering effects. However, there are just as many who will suffer the lasting images, nightmares, and medical/psychiatry bills for their entire life. Then of course it’s not the business suffering…just the victim and their families!

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                             I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

Ssshhh…for security officers only

Security officers and supervisors who want to increase their effectiveness and efficiency while on post learn little tricks to better carry out their responsibilities. I learned these tips more than 3 decades ago and while they may be old, they are time tested and will help you out.

I know what it’s like to be a security officer sitting post. I’ve done it as an officer, supervisor, and manager. Therefore I know what it’s like to be freezing my big tookus off while sitting post or patrolling outside with temperatures hovering around -30 degrees. Additionally, if you ever sit in your car watching it rain on an empty street during a strike…

Staying awake all night long on a boring post… to those who have been around…we’ve all done it. For me, it’s hard enough to stay awake long enough to do work at night. When it’s boring and you have nothing to do but patrol a silent warehouse, it’s even worse. How do you stay awake?

Am I going to bore you with all the standard stuff? No. I’m not going to tell you to get up and walk around. Go outside and sniff the air. Nor will I tell you to get more sleep during your off hours, for some of us it just doesn’t work!

Those things may not work well, especially if you’re just too tired to even think about being tired. But one simple little tip I’ve used is this… just a pinch between your cheek and gum.

I’m talking about coffee. Take a large pinch of fresh coffee grounds and put it between your cheek and gum. The caffeine will get into your system much faster than drinking it, because it gets absorbed right into your blood stream. Is it nasty? Yes. Is it bitter? Absolutely. Will it perk you up until the sun peaks up? You betcha, especially if you don’t drink a lot of it. Since it doesn’t go through your stomach, as much, it shouldn’t upset it.

If you encounter ice and snow on a frequent basis, not to mention bitter cold, what happens if you discover a frozen lock? Be it a deadbolt or padlock, it doesn’t matter it can be exasperating if you have to get it open. How can you get it unlocked to complete your patrol and get back inside where it’s warm?

Keep in mind that this can be done even if you’re not a smoker. You should always carry a lighter and a piece of newspaper with you on patrol. With this you can stuff a bit of paper into the lock and torch it or if it’s not windy hold the flame under it. It shouldn’t take much to melt any snow or ‘unfreeze’ the lock. The only time you don’t do this, is if you work in a facility where incendiary devices are forbidden.

Do you know how to properly check a door when you’re on a patrol? It doesn’t matter if you’re inside all night or have to check doors on the outside. This little trick will help ensure that your facility is as secure as it can be when you’re on duty. And it may help prevent a devastating fire as well.

When you approach a door, put your hand on the door palm down. This will allow you to feel the door for any unnecessary heat, unless you are outside in below 0 temps (it may freeze to the door. Not comfortable to pull it off). Heat that shouldn’t be there could be an indication of a fire, therefore you need to learn your facility to know if the door is supposed to be hot or not.

Secondly, push and pull the door as you turn the knob. Using the push/pull method will allow you to know that the door is actually secure. The words to keep in mind while patrolling is push, pull, feel. These give you all indications if it is secure.

This next tip goes to how sensitive your senses are. Do you smoke? If not, then sniff the air if you’re supposed to be alone, cigarette smoke lingers for a long time as does the acrid smell of chemicals. See something move out of your peripheral vision? It may be nothing more than a bird but you need to check it out. Your gut instinct should never be ignored, unless it runs away with you like a scene from a Stephen King novel.

A last tip that  may make your supervisors cringe just a bit, but trust me it is time proven and well worth the possible headache. Be paranoid or as some would call it hyper-vigilant. No, I’m not talking about things that go bump in the warehouse at night or being so scared you can’t leave your desk to do your job.

Don’t let noises go unreported or ignored. Noises at 0300 that shouldn’t be there needs to be checked out. The same goes for 1500 on a Saturday afternoon.

Criminals can break into your facility and sound like rats or birds. Therefore checking it out you may stop a burglary or other theft. This is especially true if you work in a warehouse that houses high value material.

Criminals have been known to use nights & weekends to make noise and break into buildings. People usually think that it’s remodeling or utility work and ignore it. If you are in any doubt, call the police or your supervisor, even if it is a neighboring business.

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                              I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

POLDER MODEL

(Writer note: please forgive me if the spelling is wrong…which it probably is)

Some of you may be asking…what the hell is polder model (pronounced poll der Mo dell)? I heard the term on a NPR/BBC broadcast months ago and thought the idea should be used in the United States to run our businesses. It will help the customer service attitude as well as assisting security in protecting the employees and facility.

But your question still remains, what is it? It is a form of consensus management. Basically meaning that the management of a company relies, mainly but not totally, on the consensus of all of its employees to make decisions that affect them.

While this kind of management is a wonderful idea, there are times when it doesn’t fit very well into reality. So, why am I bringing it up and writing about it? As I stated in the first paragraph it will help, if adopted and implemented the correct way within the corporate culture to ensure higher customer service satisfaction rates in addition to helping to protect the people, property, and assets of the company. All of which affects the finances of everyone.

Decisions that affect items of contention among employees, grunt and management alike, such as; sick/maternity leave, vacation times and when you can take and who can take it, shift starting times, and the percentage for raises, maybe. You may not have a union but what does it hurt to allow such democratic systems for your employees to have a say?

Why can’t other things be solved in this manner? Let me give you an example from the past why not all decisions can be made by consensus; September 1, 1939 the Polish invasion by Adolf Hitler. This may be extreme but it punctuates the fallacies of polder model with all decisions.

The Polish government was run by a legislature of 400 or so noblemen. They weren’t elected but were of the ruling class. Most were benevolent and treated people fairly…by 1939 standards. Others were not so generous, just like we still have in America although not as cruel.

ALL of the legislators had to agree on something before it was passed. Not ¾ or 90% but all of them. When the subject of Germany and its massing armies and threat to Poland was brought to them they couldn’t agree on what to do.

Those on the western border knew there was a threat. The legislators from the east were more laid back and not believing that Germany would actually invade them, relying on Russia to keep war at bay. The inaction between the two factions helped to lead to the most destructive war in human history not to mention the slaughter of millions of Poles.

In that respect and example, I agree that the polder model is not a good idea for companies to utilize. But, by allowing employees to help in managing the company, even in such small ways it gives a ‘buy-in’ to it and they have more of a stake in the company’s survival and success.

If they have a stake and are engaged in the success of the company then they are more than likely to treat their co-workers with better customer service, respect. Likewise, they will begin to treat the external customers with more respect and listen to their wants and needs more intently.

By doing those things, as well as the things I propose in my books and posts, then it will raise the company to a higher level. If it can be raised to a higher level then customers should begin to rave about them and write favorable reviews which means…more business and possibly a more secure financial footing.

With security the same thing applies. If they are involved in the company’s success then they don’t want to see anyone or anything hamper that success. Crime, fraud, workplace violence, theft, and such won’t be tolerated. Meaning that they are more likely to report anything out of the ordinary.

They will be more than willing to report any of the warning signs of a co-worker who may be on the edge for workplace violence. It could possibly be a door propped open for the smokers or someone ‘tailgating’ to get into the facility.

Back in the late 80s and early 90s I implemented a similar system at one of my posts. It was called it Team Approach to Problem Solving (TAPS). I took an issue and gave it to my officers and asked them what we should do to rectify it. It didn’t work overwhelmingly well, due to intense disinterest, but I did get some good suggestions that were given to the client and adopted. Others were not anatomically possible.

I was ridiculed by other supervisors and the branch manager, as well as the district VP, for implementing this program. Why you ask? For asking stupid guards to think about things that were not their concern and not about the things they were hired for…making rounds and letting people in the door i.e. keeping the place from fire and in production.

Can this model of Dutch management work in the United States? In a limited form. We have developed an authoritarian style of management without much say from the grunts, like me and am happy to be, albeit a malcontent, on the front line. Most managers and C-suiters are and will be unwilling to give up such power and authority. But if they look at what it could do for their bottom-line in the future and not just today…

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                              I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

Checks: Top Trend in Post-Employment Workplace Violence Prevention

By: Jo Lynn Clemens

Continual screening has become one of the top trends to reduce the risks of workplace violence.

Workplace violence results in more than 2 million victims annually and is the second leading cause of death amongst workers, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA).  OSHA defines workplace violence to mean, “any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the work site.”  Violence can range in form from verbal abuse to physical assaults and can affect employees, customers, clients and visitors.  The FBI reports that losses to corporations range between 6 to 36 billion annually with 80% of active shooter incidents occurring at a work site. The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics reports risk factors can include; “personality conflicts; a mishandled termination or other disciplinary action; bringing weapons onto a work site; drug or alcohol abuse on the job; or a grudge over a real or imagined grievance as well as family conflicts; financial or legal problems or emotional disturbance.”

Mitigation of these risks requires a detailed workplace violence prevention plan that utilizes a multi-disciplined and organization-wide approach that integrates predictive risk modeling to identify, control and predict potential incidents. The adoption of continual screening post-employment can assist employers in monitoring and deterring risks when coupled with a “zero tolerance policy”.  Pre-employment checks often miss convictions that are recorded after a worker is employed.  Recourse for infractions should be clearly defined and acknowledge in the employment handbook.

Through post-employment monitoring a company benefits from reduced settlement and defense costs, determent of crimes, protection of reputation and can serve as a market differentiator.

A few statistics on workplace violence:

Application:

– 53% of job applications contain inaccurate information

*** Society of Human Resources Management, 2003

– 49% of job applications contain fabricated information

*** CareerBuilder.com, 2008

(4% actual error rate when combining two statistic above)

Illegal Labor:

– ICE has taken action against 6.7% of the companies it’s audited

– ICE has imposed ~$76 million per year in sanctions

– ICE has arrested people at 221 employers per year

*** US Department Of Homeland Security, 2011

Workplace Violence:

– 1 in 20 will experience an episode of workplace violence annually

*** Society of Human Resources Management

– Portland nursing assistant convicted of sexually abusing 7 patients, had 28 previous counts of sexual crimes

*** KGW Portland, February 2017

Education:

– 97% of employers conducted criminal background checks

– 67% of employers conduct education background checks

– 45% of employers conduct professional license verifications

– 22% re-verify current employee backgrounds

*** All data above is from HireRight 2015 Annual Employment Benchmarking Survey

– 8,000 teacher vacancies

*** 2016 Arizona School Personnel Administrators Association survey of nearly 130 Valley school districts

Transportation:

– Estimated need for ~100,000 drivers per year over next 10 years

*** HireRight 2016 Annual Transportation Industry Survey

Healthcare:

– $40 million negligent hiring verdict against employer

*** Gurtin v. Nurse Connection, 2002

– 92% of long term care facilities have employees with previous criminal convictions

*** Office of the Inspector General from FBI records, 2011

Substance Abuse:

– More than 75% of substance abusers are employed

– 8.4% of current, full-time employees used illicit drugs

*** Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

– Substance abusers are 33% less productive and are 2.5 times more likely to be absent from work

*** US Department Of Labor

– Substance abusers cost twice as much in medical and workers’ compensation

*** US Department Of Health And Human Services

Employee Theft:

– FBI calls employee theft the fastest growing crime in America.

– 55% of employee theft is perpetrated by managers, people who have longevity in their jobs

*** American Society of Employers

Crime Incidence:

– 46.5% of violent crimes are not reported

– 46.0% odd violent crimes are cleared (solved) by police

–  National, average conviction rate is 61.5%

*** Pew Research 2016

Negligent Hiring:

– Average negligent hiring suit results in $1.6 million settlement against employer

*** Employment Screen Resources

– Employers lose >79% of negligent hiring cases

*** Fortune Magazine

– Average cost to replace employee can be between $7,000 and $40,000

*** Recruiting Times

– Average cost to replace employee is 1/3 of annual wages

*** US Department Of Labor

– Average cost to replace technical or management employee can be between 50% and 300% of annual wages

*** Society for Human Resource Management, 2008

 

I’ve Been Vetted is a patent pending post employment risk mitigation platform that includes; background, motor vehicle, credit and licensing checks coupled with machine learning algorithms specific to an organization to predict employment risk factors.

 

Compliance data and an employee’s unique risk profile are utilized to provide predictive analytics and visualization charts.  Our cutting edge platform will help guide an organization’s strategic decision making, identify potential risks and mitigate risks once they occur.

 

Jo Lynn Clemens, CPCU, ARM

I’ve Been Vetted

jolynn.clemens@ivebeenvetted.com

www.ivebeenvetted.com

 

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                                                I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear