Author: todaystrainingblog

Preventing domestic violence in the workplace-Part 2

You may not think that domestic violence (DV) is an issue for your company or security department to deal with. Unfortunately, it has become a significant security risk issue to handle. While we can’t stop it, we can help to mitigate the injuries and damage done to both the victim and company.

There are a few steps that can be taken to minimize injury to the victim and lessen the liability of the business. Will these tips listed below stop every incident on company property? More than likely not, but if you follow these few tips and make your own action plan, then you will be making a start on helping an incident be prevented.

Physical injury will be what a victim suffers from outwardly. However, it is the psychological trauma that can, and more than likely will, follow them for the rest of their lives. I’m sure that none of us wish for that to happen to a co-worker or friend, in or out of the business. Here are some tips and ideas to get the ball started on assisting the victims in making them feel safe, at least at work. It will also help you to begin building trust and confidence, or more of it, in you and the company, enabling employees to come forward with personal issues such as DV.

 

  • Listening and actually believing that the employee may be abused

If the victim is male or the male abuser is ‘charming, suave, and debonair…’ it may be hard to believe. But unless an actual investigation is undertaken by the police or other such agency… which is where the trust and confidence in you comes into play.

  • Looking for the signs of abuse, even if they deny it

These are innumerable in their own right so it is imperative that you or a member of your staff learn to recognize them. Sometimes they are not so easily spotted:

Long sleeves, slacks, and/or turtle necks in summer

Constantly wearing sunglasses

Jumpier than they would normally be

While discussing their bruises they joke about their clumsiness

Constantly coming into work with minor injuries

Becoming a loner and staying quiet when the opposite had been true

Alienating friends both at work and elsewhere

Frequent unsettling phone calls either on company phone or their cell

Of course there are numerous other signs of abuse. Contact a local domestic abuse shelter and get as much information as you can to disseminate to employees.

  • Security procedures to protect them at work

This is where your expertise as a security professional comes into play. You know when and where you can do little things to pump up the security program to make the facility more secure and keep anyone out who isn’t authorized:

If possible, issuing a photo of the abuser and keeping them off the property

Ensuring that all doors are secured with no exceptions for ‘just this once’

Issuing strict orders that no one is allowed to tailgate, follow behind another employee, into the building

Adapting high visibility of security in and around the facility

Ensuring that surveillance doesn’t become slack for as long as necessary

Never allowing an attitude of ‘I know them we’ll do it just this once’

Having your security officers, or supervisor, escort the employee when necessary

While these may be standard practice they need to be reiterated and strictly enforced. There are other procedures that you can tweak to protect one employee as well.

  • Employee Assistance programs (EAP).

The necessary references to resources to help them, including shelters. This may be up to an EAP provider; however you need to find one to allow your employees to utilize them. They may not be cheap, but the only other recourse you may have is to keep a list of resources with HR and/or publish it for the taking.

  • Can you provide any legal, security, or spiritual assistance?

Don’t let your legal department tell you that you are treading on thin ice and you can’t do this figure a way around it. If necessary refer them to the EAP for these items, especially legal and spiritual but security is our responsibility. Taking care of people is also a moral imperative.

  • Can you provide a certain amount of compassionate, paid, leave?

In other words can you give the employee time off to take care of legal issues, court dates, children, and so on. It may take some jiggling of your companies financial resources to do this but it is worth it most of the time. You can’t jettison an employee because they are having DV issues or as a result of DV. Going along with this is not counting their absences against them during this time, which according to policy could get them fired.

An example of this may be old but I really doubt corporate policies/procedures have radically changed since the early 90s; an employee took leave to care for his young son who was dying of leukemia. When he returned to work he was disciplined for having let his job performance suffer because of his son’s illness and then burying his 6-year-old. He shot and killed several managers, union reps, & supervisors in the termination meeting a week later.

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                                  I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

Most industries are discriminatory

                               “Those with sight are sometimes the most blind of all”

                                                National Federation of the Blind

That is, of course, a blanket statement and needs to be clarified. There are certain individuals and companies out there who don’t care about someone being disabled, if they know their stuff…then they hire them. But there are the majority, probably upwards of 98% who don’t even want to talk to them, despite what they publicly advocate and say they believe in inclusion & diversity…of all kinds.

Since this is a security blog I will concentrate on this industry and equate it to all others. Tell me and all disabled people who want to work for you, honestly that we don’t discriminate against anyone who is qualified to do the job? You can’t honestly tell me that we don’t…because I know better and I’ve done it myself.

Take me for an example. When I first went blind I started my own company doing what I did best…training people in how to prevent workplace violence. I had been training and managing people for more than 20 years at that point. A company would call me, or I would cold call them, and they would be hyper to get me in to train their employees.

Hyper?  Most of the time they wanted me in to train a week before, figuratively, I called them! I arrive for an appointment that should take about an hour maybe two. Within 10 minutes I was rushed out the door after they took one look at my white cane.

This has occurred on more than one occasion over the ensuing years. To make the frustration worse, no one has ever complained about my style of training or the material I present to them. Apparently going blind made me stupid. Would have thought that blindness affects thought processes as well.

It should be fairly obvious that I can’t talk or even have good thought processes to help protect people. It’s funny then about all the great comments I get from my blog postings. They love my quirky, innovative, and unique ideas that I propose but the industry is saturated with great people who can actually see… which makes me easy to ignore.

“We need you to get around and go to client sites at a moment’s notice”, and the issue with that is? Do you not pay your managers a expense for using their own vehicle? Then why can’t I call a cab to take me around to various clients? I can get vouchers that are cheaper to use and you would reimburse me as well for the expense. For that I get no answer except what sounds like harrumph.

I had an interview for an Assistant Director of Security position. I met all the job requirements and was willing to do for a national security company. I was scheduled to meet with the branch manager; instead I had to meet with the Business Development Manager, who had no clue how to interview… or me. She wanted me to tell her about myself and my experience. Typical, right?

I started telling her about my blogs and my way of doing…for 10 seconds. She then succinctly said “I don’t care about what you did in the past. I don’t care about writing and how intelligent it is. I want to know about something recent.” When I couldn’t instantly, no joke… less than 5 seconds, offer anything… “Okay I’ll have the branch manager call you later. Goodbye” she then proceeded to walk at a normal pace and expressed exasperation that I wasn’t moving fast enough through a maze of offices I’d never visited.

You can’t tell me that the security industry doesn’t discriminate against people that are disabled? I know they do. But overall businesses also discriminates along racial, gender, and religious grounds. But it is done in such a way that no one can ever claim discrimination. Sometimes the discriminatory practices creep in over time and you don’t even notice them.

How you ask? The application of course. If they don’t like your skin, beard, accent, or anything else your application will probably be round filed in #13 and no one will ever know. If for some reason you get past the application phase and get an interview…then it will probably be short, sweet, and accompanied by a no thanks don’t call us we’ll call you.

Are there other jobs at these companies you can do until you acclimate and learn the system so you can work at the job you wanted? Generally speaking, of course there are. But the immediate answer for 99.9% of all disabled job applicants…can’t, more than likely won’t, hire you right now. Mainly, the recruiter/HR doesn’t want to look deeper or make an adjustment to the company structure to allow for the disability.

I know that this post sounds awfully angry and pessimistic which is not necessarily a bad thing…representing the frustration we feel. I’m upset and angry for the people I know who want to work and can’t find it. They are wonderful men and women who want to support their families and themselves to be independent. Unfortunately fate has dealt them a poker hand they can’t possibly win with, and the next player is stealing their chips.

Robert D. Sollars, who has been blind since 2003, assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of workplace violence as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                             I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

So you are disabled and want a Job?

I hear from too many people that being disabled is all there is for them and they can’t work. And it is true that some of them can’t due to their disability. But many are younger or can work, but they refuse, or make excuses, to get the necessary training so they can gain employment.

So what does a disabled person need to do when searching for a job? The absolute simple truth is nothing special! That’s right, nothing special. So how do they get past the stigma of their disability? Simple, Apply on-line. And since so many job applications are on-line anymore…

One thing you have to do, no matter what, you have to be better than other applicants. And I’m not talking about their experience or knowledge level, although that doesn’t hurt. Being disabled, we have to be better than other applicants because if we don’t then it can be easily explained as ‘Oh they’re disabled, they can’t…, and so why teach them that if they don’t already know?’ Simplistic… maybe, realistic…yes.

 

What the disabled have To Do:

There are certain items that you have to do to increase your chances of getting that job. Here is a short list of those areas;

  • Pick a job that you are qualified for. There is no sense in applying for a job you are not…you set yourself up for failure.
  • Spell & grammar check your resume and cover letter! Unlike others, if it is error free and grammatically correct you already have an advantage because it shows diligence. If necessary, hire a professional write it or check it for errors.
  • Polish your skills. From inter-personal to typing to everything in between. By polishing your skills, you’ll have another advantage on the application, interviewing, & training sections of the hiring process.
  • Dress for Success. Wear the appropriate clothes for the job you’re interviewing for. It may seem overly simplistic, but hiring managers will judge you by the clothes you are wearing. There are many places that can get you the necessary business clothes for free, just check with a local non-profit agency.
  • Show up on time AND alone, if possible. You should always try to show up for your interview or appointment time at least 10 – 15 minutes early. And if you can go it alone… Some of us may need help in getting around the office, but if you can, and then do it.
  • Don’t smoke, eat, or drink before your interview. To a non-smoker it will hang on you like stink on a meat packing facility dumpster in the middle of a Missouri summer. Then there is the breath it will cause. You really don’t want the receptionist or interviewer with breath that smells like stale coffee, digested food, or old stale tobacco.
  • Don’t fidget, play with paper, or use your phone. Sit as up-right as you can and stay calm. Don’t mess with your hair, tie, or keep arranging your papers. As for your phone, ensure that it’s on either vibrate or turned off. Nothing will turn off an interviewer faster than having your phone ring in the middle of the interview. Most of us aren’t anywhere near to being that brilliant to have the interviewer over look that irritation.
  • Have all necessary papers in order ready to hand over. If you’re blind it should be easy, we have to be organized constantly anyway. But have your references, resume’s, and other papers in order ready to hand over with no fumbling for them. Show the employer how organized you are.

 

For those of us that are disabled, the economy is still on the rebound. So it may take a while to get our foot in the door… still. Add to that, the fact that companies are looking for specific talent and being very selective about whom they even call for interviews, and therefore you have to present yourself better than your competition.

The skills and pre-steps you need to take, even for a disabled person, is all the same. It’s not necessarily about the job or the competition. It’s all about how you present yourself. Something I learned while still in high school: “Walk like you have some where to go and something to do when you get there”

As much as you can, hold your head up straight, shoulders squared, & a confident demeanor & attitude, and try not to be arrogant about it. Whether they want to admit it or not, Perception is reality for any employer. What the employer perceives in your initial meeting is their reality and not much can be done to contradict it.

Getting a job in today’s marketplace is increasingly difficult. With unemployment rate at historic lows and the competition for skilled workers escalating and requirements of employment leave many of us in the cold. But despite our approx. 60% unemployment, we can still get a job doing what we want. We just have to do the little things a tad more impressively than someone else.

Robert D. Sollars, who has been blind since 2003, assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of workplace violence as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                          I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

Preventing domestic violence in the workplace-Part 1

It doesn’t matter whether you believe domestic violence (DV) is a serious problem or not, because it is a serious problem for victims and the businesses they work for. The reason?  48% of all workplace violence (WPV) incidents begin because of it. Unwittingly the entire staff, not to mention   human resources and security, is affected by it.

The issue becomes significant for businesses, and all of us, since DV creeps into our businesses and creates chaos, havoc, & destruction on everyone, whether they witnessed it or just know someone affected by being injured, threatened, or had the s*** scared out of them.

DV produces pandemonium amongst everyone involved, both inside the business and personal lives. It can literally cause trauma for decades. If the company is made aware of the potential, and victimization of an employee, and does nothing to combat it before it starts entering the business, then they can be held liable for the injuries, including death, and devastation that can result.

A fatality doesn’t necessarily have to have occurred for it to be injurious. Especially if you tally the emotional trauma and psychological damage done to individuals. Usually you will never know who is mentally fragile until an incident occurs and then it’s too late to prevent it, and the ensuing litigation.

A couple of statistics that may bring home DV to anyone who may not have been visited by its insidious effects;

  • 48% of all WPV incidents are related to DV
  • 40% of all WPV murders are related to DV
  • 3 – 4 women are murdered by their significant other every day of the year. Most are not at work
  • Murder is the #1 cause of death for women while at work
  • 3-5 billion annually in lost productivity, absenteeism, and health care. This is probably significantly higher

A list of DV incidents, just the high profile alone, could go on for an entire library of books. There are literally millions of DV incidents every single year. And while most DV incidents are forgotten about soon after and rarely lead to death it has the same effect on the employee (s).

Everyone gets a little distraught from time-to-time and scream at our significant others once in a while. We may even call them names that we later apologize and regret. But for some people, sometimes that anger can explode into physical contact that can hurt long after the bruises, cuts, welts, broken bones, & scratches have healed.

As for the statistics mentioned above of 3-4 women are killed every day by their significant other. This is the same number that was killed during WPV incidents every day in the 90s. We were all in such an up-roar then over that. Where is the outrage over DV because of these numbers? Is it because it happens at home and not at a business and therefore none of our stinking business? And besides it’s a personal matter. Right?

The statistics can be unsettling for some. But after you have digested and accepted them, do your own research on them, as fact; the next question is how can you protect your employees from a DV and WPV incident? For both victims and co-workers alike. It’s more than just protecting the business and its financial resources. In the next post I’ll discuss a few ways to help minimize the incident and prevent such tragedy in your business.

DV is not just a personal issue, especially when it comes into the workplace and threatens co-workers, customers, and the well-being of everyone working, shopping, or visiting. It is an issue that literally can make some employees fear for their lives, whether they are the victim, or target by association because the perpetrator will stop at nothing, no one, to kill or maim their intended victim, or not.

Emotional and psychological trauma can & will cost your business thousands. If the incident turns physical then that trauma can potentially cost your business millions and force it out of business. That will cost your employees much more than just lingering mental trauma.

Many television shows and movies have shown DV in a humorous tone. And while it can be put into a humorous light, it is seldom funny to the victim. The Honeymooners, All in the Family, & Family Guy. There was never any doubt that Ralph Kramden and Archie Bunker loved Alice & Edith, but the yelling, berating, & threats were all a part of DV.

As security and HR professionals, and human beings, we need to recognize the potential of DV to invade our work spaces and cause injury to our most valuable assets, the people who make the business run. Those injuries will typically not just be relegated to the abused employee. Many times it will spill over to co-workers and if it’s a customer or visitor…

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                       I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

How does a blind person do what they do?

Everywhere I go and talk to colleagues, even after 14 years, I get the question, how do you do that? Usually when you explain it to them it’s a “Really? Wow that is amazing”. They don’t stop to consider it has become an ingrained habit like putting on your shoes.

When at a business event, usually a networking mixer or similar, the question I get most often is “How can you help us? You’re blind, you can’t possibly know security?” And then they listen to my experience, knowledge, and presentation skills. They are impressed. Because I’m blind I can’t help them because after all I’m blind, what do I know about security.  I’ve only been in the field for 34 years.

People, including close friends, don’t understand how I can do certain things that most everyone else takes for granted. Items such as:

  • Clipping my finger nails without cutting my fingers off
  • Cooking on the stove. And the simple idea of boiling water… and not burning down the house
  • Hearing noises that others don’t
  • Get around without someone guiding me

 

Being a security professional and being blind is not easy. No one wants to take a chance because of a few innovative, creative, and quirky ideas & attributes that don’t fit into standard practice. So, keeping with security, let me explain those things I mentioned above in a security context;

  • Clipping my finger nails

When you are conducting a threat assessment on a facility, are you meticulous, careful, & attempting to see things that aren’t necessarily in front of you? Of course. Another aspect that I’m sure, you consider is that you have to account for everything that may cause an issue, no matter how remote, small, or trivial it may be. If I actually cut my finger while clipping… I staunch the blood, if there is any, before it gets worse.

Likewise with security, you try to stop an incident before it gets worse. It’s never easy to do but it must be done. It takes that meticulous, attention to detail, & being results oriented to reach your goal. Isn’t that what you do as well?

 

  • Cooking with fire

Just like all other security issues you have to be meticulous & have proper planning to accomplish the goal. With cooking food that is scalding or molten, you have to use the pot holders and ensure the pot isn’t too heavy to move safely. If the heat comes through the holder, then you have to put it down…quickly.

With the operations of your site/department, you have to be aware of the limitations of your officers & coach them carefully so that everything turns out piping hot and not burned on, or cold. Additionally, you may have to be mentoring, and training them over and above the minimum, and your, requirements.

Sometimes you have to handle certain officers with pot holders. They need to be ‘coddled’ and empathized with for a few minutes. But if it gets too much you gotta put them down & terminate. Coddling is not something any of us like to do but… as a good manager it is something we need to do on occasion.

 

  • Hearing Noises

Some people will say I’m psychotic or schizophrenic because I hear noises that others don’t pick up on. Allow me to burst that ballooning stereotype, my ears have always been above average and didn’t get better because I went blind. You have to pay attention. Especially to detail. Which means noises, sounds, & common items more than most.

When you’re alone in a dark warehouse at 0300 hours on a Sunday morning, your hearing becomes, and has to be, more alert. Rodents or other animals can make the same noises as criminals trying to break in or get away with materials.

Security officers must train their eyes, ears, & nose to recognize what should & shouldn’t be there, as does a blind person.

For a blind person, it is absolutely vital to pay attention to your ears and smell to keep ourselves out of danger. Sometimes you will taste a problem before actually encountering it. Items such as a person with stale cigarettes on their clothes/breath or doused in perfume.

 

  • Getting around without a guide

Do you need a guide to get around a new place? How about your officers after a bit of on-the-job-training? Can they get around a new assignment? With a little fumbling and confusion, of course they can. So why would we be any different just because we’re blind?

We all get turn around and confused on our whereabouts on occasion. Whether it is at a new job or out on the town. Do we make it all the time alone? No. Just as you and your officers might, we get lost on occasion. And sometimes it takes us longer to acclimate to new places, especially those that are forever changing like the workplace.

 

How we get around in life is as much of learning skills and techniques as much as it is attitude. Our attitude has to be I will conquer this problem. Talking to most blind people you may find that attitude prevalent. If we don’t have that attitude, we will fall into the stereotype of sitting around and complaining about our lot in life.

“Seize the day and conquer it”

Klingon Proverb

Robert D. Sollars, who has been blind since 2003, assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of workplace violence as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                       I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

Nearly 50% of all fatal WPV incidents begin as…

…Domestic violence (DV). That may seem preposterous to you, but it’s even worse than that. Think about the number of people you may personally know and innumerable stories of DV you hear about on a daily basis within your community. Whether those incidents are broadcast on the news as something else… who knows.

No one can definitively know if those incidents you hear about will spill over into the workplace. In any event, it will have a chilling effect on your community. No matter the size of it, from a small community of professionals to the larger overall metropolitan area you live in. It affects everyone that is even remotely close to the victim.

The actual statistic that I have is 48% of workplace violence (WPV) incidents begin as DV. Just because the number drops 2% doesn’t necessarily mean that you are less likely to die at work due to a WPV incident. Your chances are still the same…50/50. Not really such great odds, are they?

The reasonable excuses you may have for your chances being higher are that you know no DV victims or that you don’t work close enough to anyone who is a victim. In that you are 100% wrong…like those odds better? Here’s a short explanation.

Usually if a DV incident spills over into WPV it doesn’t usually stay contained to just the intended victim, especially if the intent of the perpetrator is murder. They, 99% of the time men in DV incidents, will take out their anger on whoever may be around the victim.

In their eyes, the people who are in the way, legitimately or not, are trying to keep him from his property that he has to punish for some perceived slight or oversight. The key word in that sentence? Perceived. I have said it countless times. What they perceive to be their reality is reality and no one will dissuade them from it. Delusional? You betcha and there is nothing any of us can do about it.

You will notice that one term I used above is reprehensible to most people when describing a victim. Property of the perpetrator. But that is what the perpetrator believes. The victim is their property to do with as they see fit. Order to work for them, fetch them food, cigarettes, drugs, or booze, have sex when they want it, or do whatever. The major difference between these relationships and others similar? These relationships are violent to the extreme in causing the abuse and injury. From physical, mental, psychological, and emotional.

A report from the Barrows Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ. in September 2017, that as many as 5% of all DV victims have suffered a concussion with many of those having permanent injury. Permanent injury? Mental loss, debilitating seizures, loss of coordination, and other examples of someone who has suffered severe head trauma.

Then there is the phrase ‘those standing in the way, legitimately or not. To the perpetrator, anyone, literally anyone, who is in the way of stopping them from entering the facility is aiding and abetting their property from seeing them, security, receptionist, managers and etc. It doesn’t matter if it is procedure and policy or not, they are stopping them from seeing and murdering their property. They will not stop until they see the property…even if they have to murder dozens to get to it.

So what can we do to help prevent DV and its arrival in our workplace to rein fire and brimstone upon innocent victims as well as the partner? Here is a short list of what YOU can do;

#1 if you see the victim begin shutting down emotionally after being open and having fun and friends…

#2 not stopping to chat or possibly holding their heads up any more

#3 physical injuries on their bodies such as bruising, welts, and etc. and blaming themselves for being “so damned clumsy”.

#4 report anything like this you may see to management, security, or police

According to the company, legal & HR, These are about the only things you can do albeit morally, ethically, and legally, you may be able to do a lot more. But it is obvious that something has to be done in this country to curb DV where ever it occurs.

With DV resulting in more than 48% of all WPV incidents beginning this way it is imperative that we attempt to stop it from entering the workplace. How do we do that? Another short list?

#1 sees some being abused in a store, parking lot, or other place? Report it.

#2 hears someone screaming for help while possibly in pain? Report it

#3 hears slapping sounds after an argument, or worse gun shots? Report it.

#4 even thinks someone is being abused in one way or another? Report it.

If you report possible abuse then you have fulfilled a part of your obligation as a human. Unfortunately, after that the bureaucracy takes over and you may never know what happens to the potential victim. You watch the news one night and see the television reporter telling you about a WPV incident started by a DV perpetrator.

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear

Nearly 50% of all fatal WPV incidents begin as…

…Domestic violence (DV). That may seem preposterous to you, but it’s even worse than that. Think about the number of people you may personally know and innumerable stories of DV you hear about on a daily basis within your community. Whether those incidents are broadcast on the news as something else… who knows.

No one can definitively know if those incidents you hear about will spill over into the workplace. In any event, it will have a chilling effect on your community. No matter the size of it, from a small community of professionals to the larger overall metropolitan area you live in. It affects everyone that is even remotely close to the victim.

The actual statistic that I have is 48% of workplace violence (WPV) incidents begin as DV. Just because the number drops 2% doesn’t necessarily mean that you are less likely to die at work due to a WPV incident. Your chances are still the same…50/50. Not really such great odds, are they?

The reasonable excuses you may have for your chances being higher are that you know no DV victims or that you don’t work close enough to anyone who is a victim. In that you are 100% wrong…like those odds better? Here’s a short explanation.

Usually if a DV incident spills over into WPV it doesn’t usually stay contained to just the intended victim, especially if the intent of the perpetrator is murder. They, 99% of the time men in DV incidents, will take out their anger on whoever may be around the victim.

In their eyes, the people who are in the way, legitimately or not, are trying to keep him from his property that he has to punish for some perceived slight or oversight. The key word in that sentence? Perceived. I have said it countless times. What they perceive to be their reality is reality and no one will dissuade them from it. Delusional? You betcha and there is nothing any of us can do about it.

You will notice that one term I used above is reprehensible to most people when describing a victim. Property of the perpetrator. But that is what the perpetrator believes. The victim is their property to do with as they see fit. Order to work for them, fetch them food, cigarettes, drugs, or booze, have sex when they want it, or do whatever. The major difference between these relationships and others similar? These relationships are violent to the extreme in causing the abuse and injury. From physical, mental, psychological, and emotional.

A report from the Barrows Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ. in September 2017, that as many as 5% of all DV victims have suffered a concussion with many of those having permanent injury. Permanent injury? Mental loss, debilitating seizures, loss of coordination, and other examples of someone who has suffered severe head trauma.

Then there is the phrase ‘those standing in the way, legitimately or not. To the perpetrator, anyone, literally anyone, who is in the way of stopping them from entering the facility is aiding and abetting their property from seeing them, security, receptionist, managers and etc. It doesn’t matter if it is procedure and policy or not, they are stopping them from seeing and murdering their property. They will not stop until they see the property…even if they have to murder dozens to get to it.

So what can we do to help prevent DV and its arrival in our workplace to rein fire and brimstone upon innocent victims as well as the partner? Here is a short list of what YOU can do;

#1 if you see the victim begin shutting down emotionally after being open and having fun and friends…

#2 not stopping to chat or possibly holding their heads up any more

#3 physical injuries on their bodies such as bruising, welts, and etc. and blaming themselves for being “so damned clumsy”.

#4 report anything like this you may see to management, security, or police

According to the company, legal & HR, These are about the only things you can do albeit morally, ethically, and legally, you may be able to do a lot more. But it is obvious that something has to be done in this country to curb DV where ever it occurs.

With DV resulting in more than 48% of all WPV incidents beginning this way it is imperative that we attempt to stop it from entering the workplace. How do we do that? Another short list?

#1 sees some being abused in a store, parking lot, or other place? Report it.

#2 hears someone screaming for help while possibly in pain? Report it

#3 hears slapping sounds after an argument, or worse gun shots? Report it.

#4 even thinks someone is being abused in one way or another? Report it.

If you report possible abuse then you have fulfilled a part of your obligation as a human. Unfortunately, after that the bureaucracy takes over and you may never know what happens to the potential victim. You watch the news one night and see the television reporter telling you about a WPV incident started by a DV perpetrator.

Robert D. Sollars assists businesses and their employees to lessen their risk of WPV as well as other security/customer service related issues with time tested and proven ideas. You can follow him on his Facebook page, facebook.com/oneistooomany, or twitter@robertsollars2.

                 I May be Blind but my Vision is Crystal Clear